Bleeding Gums and Oral Hygiene

Bleeding Gums and Oral Hygiene

Вlееdіng gums аrе а соmmоn рrоblеm thаt саn hаvе sеvеrаl dіffеrеnt саusеs. Іn mаnу саsеs, thе gums mау blееd іf а реrsоn usеs а hаrd-brіstlеd tооthbrush оr tоо muсh рrеssurе іs аррlіеd tо thе gums whеn brushіng. Тhіs рrоblеm mау аlsо bе thе rеsult оf а gum dіsеаsе or poor oral hygiene. Тhеrе аrе а numbеr оf орtіоns аvаіlаblе tо hеlр stор blееdіng gums, іnсludіng lіfеstуlе сhаngеs, mоuth rіnsеs, аnd dіеtаrу mоdіfісаtіоn. Allowing the dentists at My Scottsdale Dentist to dіаgnоse аnd trеаt thе undеrlуіng рrоblеm mау аlsо hеlр tо stор blееdіng frоm bеіng а соntіnuіng рrоblеm. Оnе оf thе mоst рорulаr mеthоds usеd tо stор blееdіng gums іs gаrglіng wіth wаrm sаlt wаtеr. Тhе rесоmmеndеd mіхturе іs gеnеrаllу 0.5 tеаsрооn оf tаblе sаlt mіхеd wіth 1 сuр оf wаrm wаtеr. А реrsоn shоuld thеn swіsh thіs mіхturе аrоund іn thе mоuth fоr а fеw sесоnds, gаrglе, аnd sріt оut thе mіхturе. Еquаl раrts оf hуdrоgеn реrохіdе аnd wаtеr саn аlsо bе usеd аs а gаrglе. Оn аvеrаgе, sееіng а Dr. Poulos twісе а уеаr wоrks wеll fоr mоst реорlе. А fеw реорlе саn gеt аwау wіth fеwеr vіsіts. Оthеrs mау nееd mоrе frеquеnt vіsіts. Реорlе wіth vеrу lіttlе rіsk оf саvіtіеs оr gum dіsеаsе саn dо fіnе sееіng thеіr dеntіst јust оnсе а уеаr. Реорlе wіth а hіgh rіsk оf dеntаl dіsеаsе mіght nееd tо vіsіt еvеrу thrее оr fоur mоnths, оr mоrе. Тhіs hіgh-rіsk grоuр іnсludеs:
  • Ð…mоkеrs
  • Dіаbеtісs
  • Реорlе wÑ–th сurrеnt gum dÑ–sеаsе
  • Реорlе wÑ–th а wеаk Ñ–mmunе rеsроnsе tо bасtеrіаl Ñ–nfесtіоn
  • Реорlе whо tеnd tо gеt саvÑ–tіеs оr buÑ–ld uÑ€ Ñ€lаquе
Іf blееdіng gums аrе а сhrоnіс рrоblеm, thе suffеrеr shоuld sее My Scottsdale Dentist fоr рrореr dіаgnоsіs аnd trеаtmеnt. Ѕоmе fоrms оf gum dіsеаsе mау rеquіrе mеdісаl trеаtmеnt. Іf hаrmful bасtеrіа еntеr thе blооdstrеаm аs а rеsult оf dаmаgе tо thе gums, thе іnfесtіоn соuld роtеntіаllу trаvеl thrоughоut thе еntіrе bоdу, саusіng sеvеrе mеdісаl рrоblеms іf nоt dіаgnоsеd аnd trеаtеd rіght аwау. To learn more on how you can take care of your oral health, contact us at 480-359-1123.

Post Date: September 1, 2021

Bleeding Gums and Oral Hygiene

Bleeding Gums and Oral Hygiene

Вlееdіng gums аrе а соmmоn рrоblеm thаt саn hаvе sеvеrаl dіffеrеnt саusеs. Іn mаnу саsеs, thе gums mау blееd іf а реrsоn usеs а hаrd-brіstlеd tооthbrush оr tоо muсh рrеssurе іs аррlіеd tо thе gums whеn brushіng. Тhіs рrоblеm mау аlsо bе thе rеsult оf а gum dіsеаsе or poor oral hygiene. Тhеrе аrе а numbеr оf орtіоns аvаіlаblе tо hеlр stор blееdіng gums, іnсludіng lіfеstуlе сhаngеs, mоuth rіnsеs, аnd dіеtаrу mоdіfісаtіоn. Allowing the dentists at My Scottsdale Dentist to dіаgnоse аnd trеаt thе undеrlуіng рrоblеm mау аlsо hеlр tо stор blееdіng frоm bеіng а соntіnuіng рrоblеm. Оnе оf thе mоst рорulаr mеthоds usеd tо stор blееdіng gums іs gаrglіng wіth wаrm sаlt wаtеr. Тhе rесоmmеndеd mіхturе іs gеnеrаllу 0.5 tеаsрооn оf tаblе sаlt mіхеd wіth 1 сuр оf wаrm wаtеr. А реrsоn shоuld thеn swіsh thіs mіхturе аrоund іn thе mоuth fоr а fеw sесоnds, gаrglе, аnd sріt оut thе mіхturе. Еquаl раrts оf hуdrоgеn реrохіdе аnd wаtеr саn аlsо bе usеd аs а gаrglе. Оn аvеrаgе, sееіng а Dr. Poulos twісе а уеаr wоrks wеll fоr mоst реорlе. А fеw реорlе саn gеt аwау wіth fеwеr vіsіts. Оthеrs mау nееd mоrе frеquеnt vіsіts. Реорlе wіth vеrу lіttlе rіsk оf саvіtіеs оr gum dіsеаsе саn dо fіnе sееіng thеіr dеntіst јust оnсе а уеаr. Реорlе wіth а hіgh rіsk оf dеntаl dіsеаsе mіght nееd tо vіsіt еvеrу thrее оr fоur mоnths, оr mоrе. Тhіs hіgh-rіsk grоuр іnсludеs:
  • Ð…mоkеrs
  • Dіаbеtісs
  • Реорlе wÑ–th сurrеnt gum dÑ–sеаsе
  • Реорlе wÑ–th а wеаk Ñ–mmunе rеsроnsе tо bасtеrіаl Ñ–nfесtіоn
  • Реорlе whо tеnd tо gеt саvÑ–tіеs оr buÑ–ld uÑ€ Ñ€lаquе
Іf blееdіng gums аrе а сhrоnіс рrоblеm, thе suffеrеr shоuld sее My Scottsdale Dentist fоr рrореr dіаgnоsіs аnd trеаtmеnt. Ѕоmе fоrms оf gum dіsеаsе mау rеquіrе mеdісаl trеаtmеnt. Іf hаrmful bасtеrіа еntеr thе blооdstrеаm аs а rеsult оf dаmаgе tо thе gums, thе іnfесtіоn соuld роtеntіаllу trаvеl thrоughоut thе еntіrе bоdу, саusіng sеvеrе mеdісаl рrоblеms іf nоt dіаgnоsеd аnd trеаtеd rіght аwау. To learn more on how you can take care of your oral health, contact us at 480-359-1123.

Post Date: September 1, 2021

Deep cleaning in Scottsdale: steps to prevent gum disease

According to the Center for Disease Control, over half of all American adults suffer from periodontal disease. If you are one of these people, you should know two very important facts: the first is that you're not alone. Periodontal disease is very common, but that doesn't make it something you should tolerate because it can have a drastic effect on your overall health. The second thing you should know is how to treat it. If you have gum disease, you should look into deep cleaning in Scottsdale at My Scottsdale Dentist to help correct the symptoms. Because there is no cure for periodontal disease, regular visits to the dentist are very important.

Recognizing the signs

One of the best things you can do to take care of your teeth, whether or not you have gum disease, is make regular appointments with your dentist and practice a good dental care regimen at home. If you notice early warning signs for gum disease, you'll want to make an appointment for deep cleaning at My Scottsdale Dentist in Scottsdale as soon as possible. Early warning signs for periodontal disease include:

  • Red or swollen gums
  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Receding gums
  • Loose teeth

Home care for healthy dental health

Brush your teeth. When we talk about brushing teeth, we don't mean smear some toothpaste on your teeth with a toothbrush and rinse it off. We mean scrubbing for at least three minutes first thing in the morning, after meals, and before you go to bed at night.

Floss. Floss will help remove bacteria that a toothbrush can't reach because it's located in between the teeth or just under the gum line.

Use mouth rinse. Some mouth rinses are more effective than others. Please discuss with your dentist the most effective toothpaste and mouth rinse for your dental care. When you use mouth rinse, allow it to contact all your teeth and gums for at least thirty seconds. Mouth rinse will help kill harmful mouth bacteria.

Watch what you eat and drink. Food that lingers on teeth can lead to cavities by attracting harmful bacteria. Sugary beverages, especially dark sodas, can damage or discolor teeth. If you do drink sugary beverages drink water afterward to wash the sugar off your teeth.

Advanced treatment for periodontal disease

If you have advanced gum disease, you'll want to begin taking care of the symptoms by making regular appointments for deep cleaning in Scottsdale. Depending on your particular circumstances, this could mean deep cleaning every three to six months and root planing and scaling in Scottsdale every six months. Deep cleaning will help get rid of bacteria below the gum line, which assists gum health, allowing them to support your teeth better. Root planing smooths away rough surfaces on the root surface. A rough surface allows bacteria to adhere better deep under the gums and can affect long-term tooth health.

In addition to regular dental visits, follow your dentist's recommendations for home care. For more information about deep cleaning or root planing and scaling in Scottsdale, including the exact procedure, how long it will take and the duration of the recovery period (usually after the anesthetic wears off you're back to normal with possible pain medication but should avoid certain foods until your gums fully recover), please contact us.

 


Post Date: July 4, 2014

Deep cleaning in Scottsdale: steps to prevent gum disease

According to the Center for Disease Control, over half of all American adults suffer from periodontal disease. If you are one of these people, you should know two very important facts: the first is that you're not alone. Periodontal disease is very common, but that doesn't make it something you should tolerate because it can have a drastic effect on your overall health. The second thing you should know is how to treat it. If you have gum disease, you should look into deep cleaning in Scottsdale at My Scottsdale Dentist to help correct the symptoms. Because there is no cure for periodontal disease, regular visits to the dentist are very important.

Recognizing the signs

One of the best things you can do to take care of your teeth, whether or not you have gum disease, is make regular appointments with your dentist and practice a good dental care regimen at home. If you notice early warning signs for gum disease, you'll want to make an appointment for deep cleaning at My Scottsdale Dentist in Scottsdale as soon as possible. Early warning signs for periodontal disease include:

  • Red or swollen gums
  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Receding gums
  • Loose teeth

Home care for healthy dental health

Brush your teeth. When we talk about brushing teeth, we don't mean smear some toothpaste on your teeth with a toothbrush and rinse it off. We mean scrubbing for at least three minutes first thing in the morning, after meals, and before you go to bed at night.

Floss. Floss will help remove bacteria that a toothbrush can't reach because it's located in between the teeth or just under the gum line.

Use mouth rinse. Some mouth rinses are more effective than others. Please discuss with your dentist the most effective toothpaste and mouth rinse for your dental care. When you use mouth rinse, allow it to contact all your teeth and gums for at least thirty seconds. Mouth rinse will help kill harmful mouth bacteria.

Watch what you eat and drink. Food that lingers on teeth can lead to cavities by attracting harmful bacteria. Sugary beverages, especially dark sodas, can damage or discolor teeth. If you do drink sugary beverages drink water afterward to wash the sugar off your teeth.

Advanced treatment for periodontal disease

If you have advanced gum disease, you'll want to begin taking care of the symptoms by making regular appointments for deep cleaning in Scottsdale. Depending on your particular circumstances, this could mean deep cleaning every three to six months and root planing and scaling in Scottsdale every six months. Deep cleaning will help get rid of bacteria below the gum line, which assists gum health, allowing them to support your teeth better. Root planing smooths away rough surfaces on the root surface. A rough surface allows bacteria to adhere better deep under the gums and can affect long-term tooth health.

In addition to regular dental visits, follow your dentist's recommendations for home care. For more information about deep cleaning or root planing and scaling in Scottsdale, including the exact procedure, how long it will take and the duration of the recovery period (usually after the anesthetic wears off you're back to normal with possible pain medication but should avoid certain foods until your gums fully recover), please contact us.

 


Post Date: July 4, 2014

Study shows a link may exist between poor oral hygiene and dementia

Study shows a link may exist between poor oral hygiene and dementia

If you're like most adults, you've heard since you were a kid that oral hygiene is important. The message probably started with your parent and was reinforced by school teachers and dentists like Dr. Poulos at My Scottsdale Dentist.

Now as an adult you likely realize that oral hygiene is a critical component of healthy teeth and gums, fewer cavities, and overall mouth health. A study has shown, however, that there may be reasons you didn't know about as a kid to make regular visits to your dentist. This study shows that there is a strong correlation between people with poor oral hygiene and dementia. It might be time to schedule an appointment with My Scottsdale Dentist to review your dental hygiene.

Correlation doesn't show causation, but in this case there's more than just a simple coincidence of effect. You might guess that someone with dementia is likely to not take very good care of their teeth. That's true and previous studies have shown that very fact. This study, however, has located a specific gum-disease-causing bacteria in the brain of some patients. The name of the bacteria is called Porphyromonas gingivalis and of the ten people with dementia assessed in this study, four of them had this bacteria in their brain as well. Other studies have already found correlations between inflammation in periodontal disease caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis and conditions like Alzheimer's.

According to The University of Central Lancashire, Sim Singhrao, a senior research fellow for this project, made the following statement:

"We are working on the theory that when the brain is repeatedly exposed to bacteria and/or debris from our gums, subsequent immune responses may lead to nerve cell death and possibly memory loss."

From WebMD, St John Crean, dean of the School of Medicine and Dentistry made the following comment:

"[...] it remains to be proven whether poor dental hygiene can lead to dementia in healthy people. It is also likely that these bacteria could make the existing disease condition worse."

Ten people is not a large number, but forty percent is, so before any further conclusions can be drawn, this study will need to be repeated with a larger sample size. Given that infections in the mouth can pass to the brain, as has been seen with abscessed root canals, it's not difficult to imagine that an insult to the gums or teeth can provide a passageway for a blood-borne pathogen to mobilize from the mouth, a few inches away to the brain.

Whether or not Alzheimer's or other dementia-related neurological disorders are caused or worsened by bacteria, the correlation and consistent finding of periodontal bacteria in the brain makes the point, at least for us, that regular visits to the dentist do more than improve dental health they also seem to statistically improve mental health. For more information about the ways regular dental care can improve your overall health, please contact My Scottsdale Dentist and make an appointment today.


Post Date: June 27, 2014

Study shows a link may exist between poor oral hygiene and dementia

Study shows a link may exist between poor oral hygiene and dementia

If you're like most adults, you've heard since you were a kid that oral hygiene is important. The message probably started with your parent and was reinforced by school teachers and dentists like Dr. Poulos at My Scottsdale Dentist.

Now as an adult you likely realize that oral hygiene is a critical component of healthy teeth and gums, fewer cavities, and overall mouth health. A study has shown, however, that there may be reasons you didn't know about as a kid to make regular visits to your dentist. This study shows that there is a strong correlation between people with poor oral hygiene and dementia. It might be time to schedule an appointment with My Scottsdale Dentist to review your dental hygiene.

Correlation doesn't show causation, but in this case there's more than just a simple coincidence of effect. You might guess that someone with dementia is likely to not take very good care of their teeth. That's true and previous studies have shown that very fact. This study, however, has located a specific gum-disease-causing bacteria in the brain of some patients. The name of the bacteria is called Porphyromonas gingivalis and of the ten people with dementia assessed in this study, four of them had this bacteria in their brain as well. Other studies have already found correlations between inflammation in periodontal disease caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis and conditions like Alzheimer's.

According to The University of Central Lancashire, Sim Singhrao, a senior research fellow for this project, made the following statement:

"We are working on the theory that when the brain is repeatedly exposed to bacteria and/or debris from our gums, subsequent immune responses may lead to nerve cell death and possibly memory loss."

From WebMD, St John Crean, dean of the School of Medicine and Dentistry made the following comment:

"[...] it remains to be proven whether poor dental hygiene can lead to dementia in healthy people. It is also likely that these bacteria could make the existing disease condition worse."

Ten people is not a large number, but forty percent is, so before any further conclusions can be drawn, this study will need to be repeated with a larger sample size. Given that infections in the mouth can pass to the brain, as has been seen with abscessed root canals, it's not difficult to imagine that an insult to the gums or teeth can provide a passageway for a blood-borne pathogen to mobilize from the mouth, a few inches away to the brain.

Whether or not Alzheimer's or other dementia-related neurological disorders are caused or worsened by bacteria, the correlation and consistent finding of periodontal bacteria in the brain makes the point, at least for us, that regular visits to the dentist do more than improve dental health they also seem to statistically improve mental health. For more information about the ways regular dental care can improve your overall health, please contact My Scottsdale Dentist and make an appointment today.


Post Date: June 27, 2014

Why Good Oral Hygiene is Important in Preventing Disease

We all know how important good oral hygiene is for healthy teeth and a winning smile. What many people may not be aware of, though, is how important oral hygiene is to our overall health. My Scottsdale Dentist understands just how important good oral hygiene is to our patients over all health.

Daily brushing and flossing not only helps keep your teeth clean and breath fresh, it also helps to control bacteria on teeth. When bacteria build up, the gums are more likely to become infected. When gums are infected, they become inflamed as a result of the immune system's efforts to combat the infection.

 

Periodontitis

Chemicals produced by inflamed gums damage the gums and the bone structure that holds the teeth. Periodontitis is the disease that results from inflamed gums and can cause health problems throughout the body. A 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report stated that people with periodontal disease are 40% more likely to have chronic health conditions than those with healthy gums.

 

Oral Hygiene and Other Health Conditions

In recent years, researchers have been studying the relationship between oral hygiene and other conditions to better understand the connection. An article in WebMD listed several health conditions that are more likely to affect people who have periodontitis:

 

Diabetes Inflammation impairs the body's ability to use insulin properly for controlling blood sugar. This results in a kind off negative feedback loop, where high blood sugar helps to feed the infections and make the inflammation even worse.

 

Heart Disease Heart disease patients are more likely to have periodontitis than people without heart disease by a ratio of 91% to 66%. The mechanisms for this connection are not yet fully understood. One theory is that inflammation in the mouth causes blood vessels elsewhere to become inflamed. This inflammation restricts blood flow in the body, causing the heart to work harder, which increases blood pressure.

 

Cancer Studies have reported a "surprising" connection between gum disease and the risk for various cancers.

Gerald P. Curatola, D.D.S. wrote in Dr. OZ Magazine: "...gum disease has been identified as the body's most abundant source of chronic low-grade inflammation which is described as smoldering fire in your body where the alarm bell is not answered. This causes a decrease in the body's immune response, and eventually, irreversible damage to the immune system, which is being identified as a likely factor for the increased cancer risk."

 

Pregnancy Hormonal changes women experience during pregnancy can increase their risk for periodontitis. Development of a fetus in the womb may be interfered with by infection and inflammation in other parts of the body. Many factors can contribute to low birth weight and premature birth. Researchers are still studying this connection.

As research continues into the importance of oral hygiene to overall health, My Scottsdale Dentist will continue to keep you informed of the best ways to protect your dental health. Contact us to schedule your next appointment.


Post Date: June 20, 2014

Why Good Oral Hygiene is Important in Preventing Disease

We all know how important good oral hygiene is for healthy teeth and a winning smile. What many people may not be aware of, though, is how important oral hygiene is to our overall health. My Scottsdale Dentist understands just how important good oral hygiene is to our patients over all health.

Daily brushing and flossing not only helps keep your teeth clean and breath fresh, it also helps to control bacteria on teeth. When bacteria build up, the gums are more likely to become infected. When gums are infected, they become inflamed as a result of the immune system's efforts to combat the infection.

 

Periodontitis

Chemicals produced by inflamed gums damage the gums and the bone structure that holds the teeth. Periodontitis is the disease that results from inflamed gums and can cause health problems throughout the body. A 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report stated that people with periodontal disease are 40% more likely to have chronic health conditions than those with healthy gums.

 

Oral Hygiene and Other Health Conditions

In recent years, researchers have been studying the relationship between oral hygiene and other conditions to better understand the connection. An article in WebMD listed several health conditions that are more likely to affect people who have periodontitis:

 

Diabetes Inflammation impairs the body's ability to use insulin properly for controlling blood sugar. This results in a kind off negative feedback loop, where high blood sugar helps to feed the infections and make the inflammation even worse.

 

Heart Disease Heart disease patients are more likely to have periodontitis than people without heart disease by a ratio of 91% to 66%. The mechanisms for this connection are not yet fully understood. One theory is that inflammation in the mouth causes blood vessels elsewhere to become inflamed. This inflammation restricts blood flow in the body, causing the heart to work harder, which increases blood pressure.

 

Cancer Studies have reported a "surprising" connection between gum disease and the risk for various cancers.

Gerald P. Curatola, D.D.S. wrote in Dr. OZ Magazine: "...gum disease has been identified as the body's most abundant source of chronic low-grade inflammation which is described as smoldering fire in your body where the alarm bell is not answered. This causes a decrease in the body's immune response, and eventually, irreversible damage to the immune system, which is being identified as a likely factor for the increased cancer risk."

 

Pregnancy Hormonal changes women experience during pregnancy can increase their risk for periodontitis. Development of a fetus in the womb may be interfered with by infection and inflammation in other parts of the body. Many factors can contribute to low birth weight and premature birth. Researchers are still studying this connection.

As research continues into the importance of oral hygiene to overall health, My Scottsdale Dentist will continue to keep you informed of the best ways to protect your dental health. Contact us to schedule your next appointment.


Post Date: June 20, 2014

Why Good Oral Hygiene is Important in Preventing Disease

Why Good Oral Hygiene is Important in Preventing Disease

We all know how important good oral hygiene is for healthy teeth and a winning smile. What many people may not be aware of, though, is how important oral hygiene is to our overall health. My Scottsdale Dentist understands just how important good oral hygiene is to our patients over all health.

Daily brushing and flossing not only helps keep your teeth clean and breath fresh, it also helps to control bacteria on teeth. When bacteria build up, the gums are more likely to become infected. When gums are infected, they become inflamed as a result of the immune system's efforts to combat the infection.

Periodontitis

Chemicals produced by inflamed gums damage the gums and the bone structure that holds the teeth. Periodontitis is the disease that results from inflamed gums and can cause health problems throughout the body. A 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report stated that people with periodontal disease are 40% more likely to have chronic health conditions than those with healthy gums.

Oral Hygiene and Other Health Conditions

In recent years, researchers have been studying the relationship between oral hygiene and other conditions to better understand the connection. An article in WebMD listed several health conditions that are more likely to affect people who have periodontitis:

Diabetes Inflammation impairs the body's ability to use insulin properly for controlling blood sugar. This results in a kind off negative feedback loop, where high blood sugar helps to feed the infections and make the inflammation even worse.

Heart Disease Heart disease patients are more likely to have periodontitis than people without heart disease by a ratio of 91% to 66%. The mechanisms for this connection are not yet fully understood. One theory is that inflammation in the mouth causes blood vessels elsewhere to become inflamed. This inflammation restricts blood flow in the body, causing the heart to work harder, which increases blood pressure.

 Cancer Studies have reported a "surprising" connection between gum disease and the risk for various cancers.

Gerald P. Curatola, D.D.S. wrote in Dr. OZ Magazine: "...gum disease has been identified as the body's most abundant source of chronic low-grade inflammation which is described as a smoldering fire in your body where the alarm bell is not answered. This causes a decrease in the body's immune response, and eventually, irreversible damage to the immune system, which is being identified as a likely factor for the increased cancer risk."

Pregnancy Hormonal changes women experience during pregnancy can increase their risk for periodontitis. Development of a fetus in the womb may be interfered with by infection and inflammation in other parts of the body. Many factors can contribute to low birth weight and premature birth. Researchers are still studying this connection.

As research continues into the importance of oral hygiene to overall health, My Scottsdale Dentist will continue to keep you informed of the best ways to protect your dental health. Contact us to schedule your next appointment.


Post Date: June 5, 2014

Why Good Oral Hygiene is Important in Preventing Disease

Why Good Oral Hygiene is Important in Preventing Disease

We all know how important good oral hygiene is for healthy teeth and a winning smile. What many people may not be aware of, though, is how important oral hygiene is to our overall health. My Scottsdale Dentist understands just how important good oral hygiene is to our patients over all health.

Daily brushing and flossing not only helps keep your teeth clean and breath fresh, it also helps to control bacteria on teeth. When bacteria build up, the gums are more likely to become infected. When gums are infected, they become inflamed as a result of the immune system's efforts to combat the infection.

Periodontitis

Chemicals produced by inflamed gums damage the gums and the bone structure that holds the teeth. Periodontitis is the disease that results from inflamed gums and can cause health problems throughout the body. A 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report stated that people with periodontal disease are 40% more likely to have chronic health conditions than those with healthy gums.

Oral Hygiene and Other Health Conditions

In recent years, researchers have been studying the relationship between oral hygiene and other conditions to better understand the connection. An article in WebMD listed several health conditions that are more likely to affect people who have periodontitis:

Diabetes Inflammation impairs the body's ability to use insulin properly for controlling blood sugar. This results in a kind off negative feedback loop, where high blood sugar helps to feed the infections and make the inflammation even worse.

Heart Disease Heart disease patients are more likely to have periodontitis than people without heart disease by a ratio of 91% to 66%. The mechanisms for this connection are not yet fully understood. One theory is that inflammation in the mouth causes blood vessels elsewhere to become inflamed. This inflammation restricts blood flow in the body, causing the heart to work harder, which increases blood pressure.

 Cancer Studies have reported a "surprising" connection between gum disease and the risk for various cancers.

Gerald P. Curatola, D.D.S. wrote in Dr. OZ Magazine: "...gum disease has been identified as the body's most abundant source of chronic low-grade inflammation which is described as a smoldering fire in your body where the alarm bell is not answered. This causes a decrease in the body's immune response, and eventually, irreversible damage to the immune system, which is being identified as a likely factor for the increased cancer risk."

Pregnancy Hormonal changes women experience during pregnancy can increase their risk for periodontitis. Development of a fetus in the womb may be interfered with by infection and inflammation in other parts of the body. Many factors can contribute to low birth weight and premature birth. Researchers are still studying this connection.

As research continues into the importance of oral hygiene to overall health, My Scottsdale Dentist will continue to keep you informed of the best ways to protect your dental health. Contact us to schedule your next appointment.


Post Date: June 5, 2014
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